Geeveston Fanny semi-dwarfing View larger

Geeveston Fanny semi-dwarfing

A small attractive bright reddish purple apple with white sweet flesh. Ideal for lunchboxes. Heavy and regular bearer. This variety was popular as a commercial apple during the 1970's in Tasmania.

The story goes like this: about 1870 Mr Hawkins, the storekeeper at Shipwrights Point near Huonville imported 6 apple trees of unknown variety and sold them to a Mr Evans of Geeveston. One in particular appealed to Mr Evans and he named it Susan's Pride after his wife.

In 1908 a Mr Ashlin obtained scions of this variety and reworked 4 acres of his orchard to it, renaming it after his wife Fanny. It became an important local variety because of its good quality, colour and resistance to black spot. In 1970 127,000 boxes of Geeveston Fanny's were exported, but it's hard to find one today.

More details

$29.00

  • Normal
  • Small

Specifications

Ripening Time March - April
Fertility Needs a pollinator (produces viable pollen)
Growth Habit Can be espaliered and kept to 1.5 - 2.5m. Free standing tree grows to around 2 -2.5m tall.
Rootstock Dwarfing rootstock
Chill Tolerance Normal chill
Plant Sizes Normal: approx 70-130cm bare rooted; Small: approx 50-70cm bare rooted

Pollination Guide

  • Pollination is far simpler than most people think. Generally, unless self fertile simply get 2 or more different varieties in the same group (eg pears) to ensure adequate pollination. A more comprehensive explanation can be found in our Pollination Guide
  • More information on Espaliering
  • More information in our Articles and on planting and pruning.
  • Answers to Common Questions.

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Geeveston Fanny semi-dwarfing

Geeveston Fanny semi-dwarfing

A small attractive bright reddish purple apple with white sweet flesh. Ideal for lunchboxes. Heavy and regular bearer. This variety was popular as a commercial apple during the 1970's in Tasmania.

The story goes like this: about 1870 Mr Hawkins, the storekeeper at Shipwrights Point near Huonville imported 6 apple trees of unknown variety and sold them to a Mr Evans of Geeveston. One in particular appealed to Mr Evans and he named it Susan's Pride after his wife.

In 1908 a Mr Ashlin obtained scions of this variety and reworked 4 acres of his orchard to it, renaming it after his wife Fanny. It became an important local variety because of its good quality, colour and resistance to black spot. In 1970 127,000 boxes of Geeveston Fanny's were exported, but it's hard to find one